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Recent Yaz/Yasmin News

November 2, 2011

New Study Confirms the Dangers of Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocella

A study published in the British Medical Journal on October 25, 2011 confirms that Yaz, Yasmin and Ocella are at least twice more likely to cause dangerous blood clots than other types of birth control pills.

All birth control pills carry some risk of causing blood clots. However, recent studies have shown that Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocella may carry a higher risk of causing blood clots than other birth control pills. Birth control pills contain two types of hormones, estrogen and progestin. It is drospirenone, the progestin in Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocella, that researchers believe is to blame for the increased incidence of blood clots that occurs with those pills. The new study found that women who use birth control pills containing drospirenone are at least twice as likely to suffer from blood clots as women that use birth control pills that contain levonorgestrel, a different type of progestin. The study is available here

This study confirms previous concerns about these pills. In April 2011, the British Medical Journal published two studies that also found that Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocellla users suffer more blood clots that women who use other types of birth control pills. The new study was a large-scale study designed to confirm these previous findings.

The authors of these studies have concluded that Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocella are “not as safe” as other birth control pills, and “should not be the first choice in oral contraception.” Furthermore, the authors found that “no clear evidence exists to show that the drospirenone pill confers benefits above those of other oral contraceptives in preventing pregnancy, treating acne, alleviating premenstrual syndrome, or avoiding weight gain.” In other words, the researchers found that Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocella do not provide any benefits that other, safer, birth control pills do not have, and there is no medical reason to use Yaz, Yasmin, or Ocella instead of a safer birth control pill.

October 15, 2011

ABC News Investigation: New Studies Find Yaz More Risky Than Other Leading Birth Control Pills.

ABC News covers the story of Carissa Ubersox, a young pediatric nurse who blames Yaz for nearly killing her, and causing her to go blind at the age of 24. As reported by ABC, while all birth control pills carry some risk, multiple studies show that Yaz has a two to three times higher risk than other birth control pills. That is, Yaz users are two to three times more likely to suffer blood clots than users of other birth control pills, according to the studies. Blood clots can cause death and serious, permanent injuries.

For more information, see the links below.

May 15, 2011

 

FDA Warns of Increased Risk of Blood Clots associated with Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocella

The FDA is further reviewing the risk and expects to have results of its investigation later this summer.

On May 31, 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Safety Alert directed to women who use Yaz, Yasmin, Ocella, and other drospirenone-containing birth control pills. The warning announces that two recently published studies report a greater risk of suffering a blood clot associated with birth control pills that contain drospirenone than with other birth control pills. The two studies showed that women who use Yaz, Yasmin or Ocella have a 2-3 times greater risk of suffering a blood clot than women who use birth control pills that contain levonorgestrel (and not drospirenone), such as Alesse, Nordette, Triphasil, or Trivora. The studies are available for free on the British Medical Journal’s website, at the following links:

Risk of venous thromboembolism in users of oral contraceptives containing drospirenone or levonorgestrel: nested case-control study based on UK General Practice Research Database, by Lianne Parkin, Katrina Sharples, Rohini Hernandez, and Susan Jick: http://www.bmj.com/content/342/bmj.d2139.full

Risk of non-fatal venous thromboembolism in women using oral contraceptives containing drospirenone compared with women using oral contraceptives containing levonorgestrel: case-control study using United States claims data, by Susan Jick and Rohini Hernandez: http://www.bmj.com/content/342/bmj.d2151.full

Most birth control pills contain two types of hormones, an estrogen and a progestin. Drospirenone is the progestin hormone contained in the birth control pills Yaz, Yasmin, and Ocella. Other birth control pills use different progestin hormones, for example levonorgestrel or norgestimate.  A list of birth control pills that contain drospirenone is available here:http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm257164.htm#table1.

The FDA recommends that women using Yaz, Yasmin, or Ocella consult their healthcare provider before they stop using the pills. The FDA also recommends that women using Yaz, Yasmin or Ocella contact their healthcare provider immediately if they develop symptoms of a blood clot, such as persistent leg pain, severe chest pain, or sudden shortness of breath.

Blood clots are also known as venous thromboembolisms (VTE). A blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body might also be called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A blood clot that forms in or travels to the lung is also called a pulmonary embolism (PE).

The FDA encourages anyone who has suffered an adverse event or side effect while using Yaz, Yasmin, or Ocella to report it to the FDA through their MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program. An Adverse Event report can be submitted to the FDA either online at www.fda.gov/MedWatch/report.htm, or by calling 1-800-332-1088.

The FDA’s warning is available here:http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm257337.htm.

Additional information from the FDA regarding the safety of Yaz, Yasmin and Ocella is available here: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm257164.htm.

The FDA has also provided a list of questions and answers about birth control pills containing drospirenone and the risk of blood clots, available here:http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/PostmarketDrugSafetyInformationforPatientsandProviders/ucm257175.htm.

If you or someone you love has been injured by Yaz, Yasmin, or Ocella, contact the attorneys at Schlichter, Bogard, and Denton for a free consultation.

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